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Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Steven Ritz, University of California, Santa Cruz
Host
Bianco
The combination of wide field of view, high sensitivity, broad energy range, and agility offers huge scientific opportunities and new ways of operating. I’ll discuss two seemingly very different observatories that share these characteristics. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), currently under construction, is an integrated survey system with an eight-meter class primary mirror and 3 gigapixel camera, designed to conduct a decade-long, deep, wide, fast time-domain survey of the optical sky from Cerro Pachón in central Chile.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Constanze Liaw, University of Delaware
Host
Chui
In the theory of rank one perturbations, we assume we know all the spectral properties (eigenvalues, scattering states and singular continuous spectrum) of a given Hermitian operator and then add another Hermitian operator whose range is one-dimensional. We are interested in the the spectral properties of the resulting operator. This seemingly simple problem gives way to a surprisingly rich theory.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Miguel Mostafa, Penn State
Host
Chui
High-energy gamma-ray observations are an essential probe of cosmic-ray acceleration mechanisms. The detection of the highest energy gamma rays and the shortest timescales of variability are the key to improve our understanding of the acceleration processes and the environment of the cosmic accelerators. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) experiment is a large field of view, multi-TeV, gamma-ray observatory continuously operating at 14,000 ft since March, 2015.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Irene Tamborra, Associate Professor at the Neils Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen and winner of the Shakti Duggal Award 2019
Host
Gaisser
Neutrinos are key particles in a wide range of astrophysical sources. Neutrinos affect the stellar dynamics, drive the formation of new elements, carry information about the physics of the most energetic events in our Universe, and reveal hints of possible physics beyond the one foreseen by the Standard Model. Recent developments on the role of neutrinos in cosmic sources will be reviewed. The detection perspectives of neutrinos will be outlined.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Richard Spencer, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Host
Chui

Quantification of changes in the macromolecular constituents of tissue is a major theme in biomedical magnetic resonance (MR). In many cases, constituents can only be distinguished through their differing water transverse relaxation times, instead of by frequency differences as is more familiar in MR spectroscopy. However, this requires implementation of multiexponential transverse relaxation analysis (METRA), a special case of the inverse Laplace transform, a notoriously ill-posed and unstable inverse problem.

Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Raghuveer Parthasarathy, University of Oregon
Host
Lyman
In any ecosystem, the physical structure of the landscape and the activities of its resident organisms influence one another. This holds in the vertebrate gut as well, where legions of microbes cooperate, compete, and influence both normal and disease-related functions of their hosts. In intestinal ecosystems, however, we know little about the spatial structure, bacterial behaviors, and physical forces present, severely limiting our ability to understand and eventually engineer the gut flora.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Daniel Savin, Columbia University
Host
Safronova
Tracing the evolution of baryonic matter from atoms in space to stars such as our Sun hinges on an accurate understanding of the underlying physics controlling the properties of the gas at every step along this pathway. Here I will explain some of the key epochs in this cosmic cycle of gas.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Veronique Petit, University of Delaware
Host
Chui
Hot O-, B-, and A-type stars lack the vigorous subsurface convection thought to drive the dynamos that produce the magnetic activity of the Sun and other cool stars. It therefore came as a surprise when strong, organized magnetic fields were discovered in a subset of intermediate mass “ApBp” stars, with field strengths ranging from 100 - 10,000 gauss.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Eun-Suk Seo, University of Maryland
Host
Chui
One of the most exciting possibilities in cosmic ray research is the potential to discover new phenomena. Elementary particles were discovered in cosmic rays before modern-day accelerators became available to study their detailed properties. Since the discovery of cosmic ray antiprotons in 1979 using a balloon-borne magnet spectrometer, a series of magnet spectrometers have been flown to search for the signature of dark matter annihilation/decay in antiprotons and positrons.
Event Types