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Location
SHL215
Speaker
Hector Martinez-Seara, Czech Academy of Sciences
Host
Lyman

Carbohydrates play a pivotal role in numerous functions in all organisms. However, contrary to other biomolecules, such as DNA or proteins, where techniques for their structural determination are abundant, saccharides are usually harder to study, because of their high conformational flexibility in solution. As a result, the adaptation of established structural biology methods to sugars is rarely straightforward. Raman, ROA (its chiral sensitive counterpart) and NMR spectroscopies are highly sensitive to any structural changes and hydration.

Location
SHL215
Speaker
Lloyd Woodham, University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory
Host
Maruca

The solar wind is a dynamic plasma environment supporting waves, instabilities, and turbulent fluctuations over a broad range of scales. These multi-scale couplings between electromagnetic fluctuations and particles are integral to our understanding of energy transport and heating in plasmas. In situ measurements of the solar wind provide insights into these fundamental processes, making it an excellent plasma laboratory to quantify the flow of energy in other collisionless astrophysical plasmas.

Date
Time
2:00pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Jacek Klos, Ph.D. University of Maryland
Host
Lyman

I will present applications of quantum chemical ab initio methods in calculations of van der Waals (vdW) intermolecular interactions. vdW forces are important in many areas of physical chemistry. The focus will be on their interest in astrophysical modeling of abundances of selected molecular species that are present in the interstellar media (ISM) and on applications to cold chemistry. Recent advances in electronic structure methods coupled with a rapid increase of computational power allow for very precise modeling of molecule-molecule scattering.

Date
Time
2:00pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Deepak Iyer, Ph.D. Bucknell University
Host
Lyman

Over the last decade or so, interest in the dynamics of interacting quantum systems has grown tremendously, mostly due to breakthroughs in experiments using ultracold atoms, and new theoretical tools. New phenomena like the dynamical localization of interacting particles, dynamical fermionization, and nonergodic behavior have been predicted and observed recently.
As physicists, we are always looking for new ways to think about and understand these phenomena. In this talk, I will present some of our recent work where we show how we can understand certain dynamical problems in one dimensional systems using an emergent description in terms of a static system. This emergent description makes it clear why certain properties (long-range correlations, e.g.) appear as they do, and allows us a new interpretation of the physics.

Date
Time
2:00pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Jaroslaw (Jarek) Majewski, Ph. D., Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM; BIO/MCB NSF Alexandria VA; Prof. (adjunct) UC Davis, CA.
Host
Lyman

Neutrons due to their penetrability, non-perturbative nature, isotopic and low-Z elements sensitivity are frequently utilized to study bio-relevant systems including biological interfaces. The presentation will demonstrate how the strength of neutron scattering can be applied to understand two very different systems: (a) simple engineered polymer-supported lipid bilayers at solid-liquid interfaces and (b) highly complex arrangement of living cells adhesion and their response to external shear stress mimicking blood flow.