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Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Ying Wang
Host
Xiao
The emergent quantum materials such as 2D Van der Waals materials and topological materials, exhibit many unconventional properties like reduced dielectric screening, divergent quantum geometry and nontrivial topology. The structural phase engineering or transformation of the atomic building blocks in these quantum platforms promises to deepen our understanding of their unique structure-property relationship, breed novel computational device concepts and revolutionize technologies in data storage and thermal management.
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Xufeng Zhang, Argonne National Laboratory
Host
Xiao

With recent demonstration of quantum computing and quantum communication, quantum information science has been changing our world in an unprecedented way. To fully explore the power of quantum information processing, it is important to further combine discrete quantum elements and build distributed quantum networks. However, this poses significant technical challenges because quantum coherence can be easily destroyed as the signal propagates through different systems.

Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Yi Li, Argonne National Laboratory
Host
Xiao

In the race of post-CMOS computing technologies, coherent information processing with microwave circuits have demonstrated great potentials with the recent breakthrough in quantum computing, where both the quanta and the phase of the excitation states can be utilized for carrying and processing information. As one of the candidate excitations for coherent information processing, magnons are collective excitations of exchange-coupled spins in magnetic materials with the natural frequency lying in the microwave regime.

Location
SHL 215
Speaker
R. C. Budhani, Morgan State University
Host
Jungfleiscih
The two-dimensional diffusive metal stabilized at the interface of SrTiO3 and the Mott insulator LaTiO3 has challenged many notions related to the formation and electronic behavior of the two-dimensional electron gas at the well studies LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Here we discuss specifically the stability of the superconducting phase at LaTiO3 - SrTiO3 interface and the nature of the superconductor - normal metal quantum phase transition driven by a magnetic field and by carrier density modulation through electrostatic gating.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
John Cumings, University of Maryland
Host
Jungfleisch
A scholarly adage of Materials Science tells us that, "Materials are like people; it's the defects that make them interesting!" However, when it comes to truly understanding basic physical properties, defects in crystals routinely present tough problems. Artificial Spin Ice (ASI) is a class of lithographically fabricated synthetic materials where the exact structure can be controlled precisely on nm length scales that determine their magnetic behavior. This provides a unique and fertile platform to study the behavior of magnetic order parameters and other degrees of freedom within solids.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Joseph Sklenar
Host
Jungfleisch
One path towards realizing an artificial spin system involves nanostructuring thin magnetic films into single magnetic domain elements or islands. In the simplest form, these islands behave as giant Ising (binary) spin states which can be mapped onto spin-lattice models. The earliest example of such a nanomagnet system was the so-called artificial spin ice system, where an artificial spin system was designed to promote geometric frustration and simulate real spin ice materials. However, as interest in artificial spin ice grew, other areas of inquiry developed.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Xin Fan, University of Denver
Host
Xiao

The anomalous Hall effect, discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880, describes a phenomenon that an electric current perpendicular to magnetization of a magnetic material can produce a charge accumulation in the direction orthogonal to both electric current and magnetization. Through century-long theoretical and experimental efforts, it is now understood that the anomalous Hall effect arises from the spin-orbit coupling.

Location
SHL215
Speaker
Hilary Hurst, University of Maryland College Park
Host
Nikolic
Control of magnetic textures via electric currents is an important step toward fabricating robust magnetic memory devices. We study the effect of conduction electrons on magnetic domain walls (DWs) in metallic, ferromagnetic nanowires. Using the Keldysh collective coordinate technique, we show how conduction electrons act as an external bath and derive the corresponding Langevin equations of motion for a DW including an electron-induced response kernel. The DW dynamics is described by two collective degrees of freedom: position and tilt-angle.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Zachary Ulissi, Carnegie Mellon University
Host
Nikolic
Increasing computational sophistication and resources can enable a larger and more integrated role of theory in the discovery and understanding of new materials. This process has been slower to infiltrate surface science and catalysis than the field of bulk inorganic materials due to additional scientific complexity of modeling the interface.