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Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Yang-Hao Chan, University of California at Berkeley
Host
Nikolic
Atomically thin quasi two-dimensional (2D) insulating materials exhibit novel exciton physics due to ineffective screening, quantum confinement, and topological effects. Such exciton physics has recently been studied in details experimentally and theoretically. Going beyond near-equilibrium set-up, one expects that excitonic effects also dominate the responses of out-of-equilibrium systems and can lead to interesting phenomena in optically-driven 2D materials.
Location
Wolf 318
Speaker
Ryan Requist, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics
Host
Nikolic

The properties of molecules and solids derive from the quantum mechanics of the electrons and nuclei they are made of. As a full quantum many-body treatment is impractical, virtually all theories begin from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, where the many-electron problem is solved under the assumption that the usually sluggish nuclei are fixed in space. Solving the many-electron problem again and again for different fixed nuclear positions maps out an electronic wave function Phi_R, a conditional probability amplitude, depending parametrically on the set of nuclear coordinates R.

Location
Brown Lab 219
Speaker
Hao Shi, Flat Iron Institute
Host
Nikolic
The emergent and fascinating phenomena in strongly correlated quantum materials are in the interests of both fundamental science, material design, and technological applications. A major challenge is to be able to accurately compute the properties of electrons in these materials. Auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo is a promising numerical method for strongly correlated quantum systems. It is proven to be highly accurate and be able to treat large number of electrons in the Simons many-electron collaboration.
Location
**MEM111***
Speaker
Patrick Vora, George Mason University
Host
Xiao

Atomically thin materials derived from layered crystals have occupied much of the condensed matter community since the discovery of graphene in 2004. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are among the most versatile members in the family of layered materials due to the opportunities for tuning electronic behaviors with chemical composition, layer number, and structural phase.

Location
Sharp Lab 116
Speaker
Shiming Lei, Princeton
Host
Xioa

Quantum materials are believed to be key for many next-generation technologies, such as sensing, computing, modeling or communication, with higher accuracy or efficiency. Particularly, the magnetic quantum materials are promising for spintronic applications due to the interplay of magnetic order with electronic properties. To study the intrinsic material properties and evaluate the performance of novel devices fabricated from these materials, a high material quality is necessary. Otherwise the desired properties might be obscured.

Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Ying Wang
Host
Xiao
The emergent quantum materials such as 2D Van der Waals materials and topological materials, exhibit many unconventional properties like reduced dielectric screening, divergent quantum geometry and nontrivial topology. The structural phase engineering or transformation of the atomic building blocks in these quantum platforms promises to deepen our understanding of their unique structure-property relationship, breed novel computational device concepts and revolutionize technologies in data storage and thermal management.
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Xufeng Zhang, Argonne National Laboratory
Host
Xiao

With recent demonstration of quantum computing and quantum communication, quantum information science has been changing our world in an unprecedented way. To fully explore the power of quantum information processing, it is important to further combine discrete quantum elements and build distributed quantum networks. However, this poses significant technical challenges because quantum coherence can be easily destroyed as the signal propagates through different systems.

Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Yi Li, Argonne National Laboratory
Host
Xiao

In the race of post-CMOS computing technologies, coherent information processing with microwave circuits have demonstrated great potentials with the recent breakthrough in quantum computing, where both the quanta and the phase of the excitation states can be utilized for carrying and processing information. As one of the candidate excitations for coherent information processing, magnons are collective excitations of exchange-coupled spins in magnetic materials with the natural frequency lying in the microwave regime.