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Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Zhang Kuang, Aalto University, Finland
Host
Raut
Uniaxial anisotropic impurity immersed in liquid Helium 3 strongly influences the scattering properties of quasiparticles as well as the symmetry breaking scheme. When the temperature of the system continuously decreased, the symmetry of normal phase Helium-3 is broken sequentially into polar phase and polar-distorted B-phase. The Kibble-Lazarides-Shafi(KLS) domain wall attached on a cosmic string-like defect was observed in this process. By using the relative homotopy group, we find the KLS wall-strings in Helium-3 form a network.
Event Types
Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Dr. Newton Nath, University of Mexico (UNAM), Mexico
Host
Raut
Neutrino non-standard interactions (NSIs), possible sub-leading effects originating from new physics beyond the Standard Model may affect the propagation of neutrinos and eventually contribute to the measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this talk, we shall discuss how NSIs will affect the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and the Dirac CP phase. Considering the light (e.g., U(1)^\prime ) and heavy (e.g., \nu2HDM) mediator models, we shall discuss here how one can find a few sizable NSI parameters in these models.
Event Types
Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Tanguy Pierog, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Germany
Host
Raut
The deficit of muons in the simulation of extensive air showers is a long-standing problem and the origin of large uncertainties in the reconstruction of the mass of the high energy primary cosmic rays. Hadronic interaction models re-tuned after early LHC data have a more consistent description of the muon content among them but still disagree with data.
Event Types
Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Joydeep Chakrabortty, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India
Host
Raut
Effective Field Theory (EFT) technique is one of the most elegant ways to capture the impact of high scale theory, if any, at some low energy by incorporating higher mass dimensional effective operators. In this talk, I will try to motivate how one can use EFT to bring different new physics scenarios in the same footing such that we can perform a comparative analysis. I will also emphasize, how the discovery of a new particle can change our perspective and what kind of modification one should do to grab the footprints of unknown physics. In this context, I will toss the concept of BSMEFT.
Event Types
Location
ZOOM info TBD
Speaker
Anil Thapa, Oklahoma State University
Host
Raut
We present a model of radiative neutrino masses which also resolves anomalies reported in meson decays, and , as well as in muon measurement, . Neutrino masses arise in the model through loop diagrams involving TeV-scale leptoquark (LQ) scalars and . Fits to neutrino oscillation parameters are obtained satisfying all flavor constraints which also explain simultaneously anomalies in , and .
Event Types
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Swati Singh, University of Delaware
Host
Raut
When properly engineered, simple quantum systems such as harmonic oscillators or spins can be excellent detectors of feeble forces and fields. Following a general introduction to this fast growing area of research I will focus on using optomechanical systems as sensors of weak strain fields. We show that certain mechanical systems can compete with interferometric detectors and potentially surpass the gravitational strain limits set by them for pulsar sources within a few months of integration time.
Event Types
Location
SHL217
Speaker
Dr. Tommi Tenkanen, John Hopkins University
Host
Raut
The observed dark matter (DM) abundance in the Universe can be fully accounted for by a minimally coupled spectator scalar field that was light during inflation. In this scenario, dark matter was produced during inflation by amplification of quantum fluctuations of the spectator field. I will discuss the DM isocurvature perturbations that are unavoidably generated in such scenarios and the circumstances under which they are not problematic for the viability of non-thermal DM models.
Event Types
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Hrvoje Dujmovic, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Host
Schroeder
Despite countless evidence for its existence, the nature of dark matter remains one of the main open questions in modern physics. If the dark matter is composed of heavy particles, dark matter decay or self-annihilation can be expected to produce high energy neutrinos. A dark matter neutrino signature could be detectable by a neutrino telescope, such as The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic kilometre detector located at the geographic South Pole. With over 5000 optical sensors, IceCube detects the Cherenkov light emitted by particles produced in neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice.
Event Types
Location
Please note location **SHL251**
Speaker
Oleg Popov, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
Host
Raut
We present a set of minimal Dirac neutrino mass models and discuss their cosmological consequences. Specifically, such models generate a neutrino mass at tree level and can have a multiple gravitational wave signature through primordial phase transition(s), can explain the asymmetry between matter and antimatter via neutrinogenesis and accommodate a dark matter candidate in dark glueballs or dark baryons. We discuss situations where the effects on the parameter space from different cosmological considerations overlap and are complimentary to collider probes.
Event Types