Research News

Harnessing fundamental physics of topological insulators for thermoelectric energy conversion

June 19, 2014 - In the recent Nano Letters article, Prof. Nikolic and DPA graduate student Po-Hao Chang, in collaboration with Prof. Naoto Nagaosa and Prof. Mohammad Saeed Bahramy from the University of Tokyo and RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan, have proposed a new type of nanoscale thermoelectric which exploits fundamental physics of topological states of matter to convert waste heat into electricity.   

Spin-Seebeck effect on the surface of topological insulators

May 14, 2014 - In the recent Physical Review B article, Prof. Nikolic and physics graduate students Po-Hao Chang and Farzad Mahfouzi, together with Prof.

UD scientists involved in 2013 Breakthrough of the Year in physics

December 13, 2013 - The IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory, an international scientific collaboration that includes researchers from the University of Delaware, has been awarded the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year by the British magazine Physics World. The Antarctic observatory has been selected for making the first observations of cosmic neutrinos. These particles, the “high-energy messengers of the universe,” zip through space and may yield important clues to the origins of the universe.

Evidence for high-energy extraterrestrial neutrinos at the IceCube detector ushers in 'new age of astronomy'

November 21, 2013 - Neutrinos can zip right through your body, the walls of your house, entire planets, even emerging from near the surface of fascinating and frightening black holes. And now, an international scientific collaboration that includes researchers from the University of Delaware has taken an astronomical step forward in unmasking the origins of some of these high-energy particles, the so-called “messengers of the universe.”

Researchers using data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole reveal new information about the origin of cosmic rays

August 29, 2013 - The origin of cosmic rays in the universe has confounded scientists for decades. But a study by researchers using data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole reveals new information that may help unravel the longstanding mystery of exactly how and where these “rays” (they are actually high-energy particles) are produced.

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