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Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Raghuveer Parthasarathy, University of Oregon
Host
Lyman
In any ecosystem, the physical structure of the landscape and the activities of its resident organisms influence one another. This holds in the vertebrate gut as well, where legions of microbes cooperate, compete, and influence both normal and disease-related functions of their hosts. In intestinal ecosystems, however, we know little about the spatial structure, bacterial behaviors, and physical forces present, severely limiting our ability to understand and eventually engineer the gut flora.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Daniel Savin, Columbia University
Host
Safronova
Tracing the evolution of baryonic matter from atoms in space to stars such as our Sun hinges on an accurate understanding of the underlying physics controlling the properties of the gas at every step along this pathway. Here I will explain some of the key epochs in this cosmic cycle of gas.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Veronique Petit, University of Delaware
Host
Chui
Hot O-, B-, and A-type stars lack the vigorous subsurface convection thought to drive the dynamos that produce the magnetic activity of the Sun and other cool stars. It therefore came as a surprise when strong, organized magnetic fields were discovered in a subset of intermediate mass “ApBp” stars, with field strengths ranging from 100 - 10,000 gauss.
Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Eun-Suk Seo, University of Maryland
Host
Chui
One of the most exciting possibilities in cosmic ray research is the potential to discover new phenomena. Elementary particles were discovered in cosmic rays before modern-day accelerators became available to study their detailed properties. Since the discovery of cosmic ray antiprotons in 1979 using a balloon-borne magnet spectrometer, a series of magnet spectrometers have been flown to search for the signature of dark matter annihilation/decay in antiprotons and positrons.
Event Types
Location
Gore104
Speaker
Dr. Woowon Kang, University of Chicago
Host
Chui
In two spatial dimensions quantum mechanical particles are not limited to being bosons or fermions but can become particles known as anyons. There is a strong theoretical support for the elementary excitations of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) being anyons. Anyons are said to come in two major flavors: Abelian and non-Abelian. The enigmatic evendenominator FQHE state at filling of n = 5/2 is perhaps the most likely candidate for non- Abelian statistics.
Event Types
Location
Gore104
Speaker
Stéphanie Valleau, SCOL Fellow, Stanford University
Host
Lyman

Chemical and physical processes such as reaction dynamics and the transport of molecular
excitations have been occurring on earth for the last few billions of years. In time, reactive
processes led to the appearance of life through the formation of amino acids, nucleic acids and
eventually, proteins, RNA and DNA. Photosynthetic bacteria, the first recorded forms of life on
earth, have evolved biologically over the last three billion years. During this evolution,

Event Types
Location
Gore104
Speaker
Dr. Peter Schiffer, Yale University
Host
Jungfleisch

Artificial spin ice consists of arrays of lithographically fabricated single-domain ferromagnetic elements, arranged in different geometries such that the magnetostatic interactions between the moments are frustrated. Because we can both design the lattice geometries and probe the individual moments, these systems allow us to study the accommodation of frustration with exquisite detail and flexibility.

Event Types
Location
Gore 104
Speaker
Sidney Nagel, University of Chicago
Host
Chui
In a crystal with only one atom per unit cell, all atoms play the same role in producing the solid's global response to external perturbations. Disordered materials are not similarly constrained and a new principle emerges: independence of bond-level response. This allows one to drive the system to different regimes of behavior by successively removing individual bonds. We can thus exploit disorder to achieve unique, varied, textured and tunable global response or long-range interactions inspired by allosteric behavior in proteins.
Event Types
Location
Gore 103
Speaker
Dr. Alexei Kananenka, Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago
Host
Lyman

While theoretical methods designed to study molecules, such as density functional theory (DFT) are computationally cheap and have proven successful, their application to strongly correlated materials such as fascinating new substances that can be used for sensing, signal conversion, memory modules, and spintronics, often leads to qualitatively wrong results. In the first part of my talk, I will present a recently developed self-energy embedding theory (SEET), which is capable of describing a few strongly correlated electrons embedded in the field of delocalized electrons.

Event Types