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Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Francesco Pucci, University of Calabria
Host
Matthaeus
Turbulence and reconnection are two phenomena that go hand in hand in astrophysical plasmas. On the one hand, magnetic reconnection is part of the turbulent cascade dynamics, being triggered at the interface of two different magnetic islands. On the other hand, the magnetic reconnection process ejects plasma jets that trigger turbulence in the reconnection exhausts. This talk will be devoted to this second aspect of the relationship between turbulence and reconnection. Two numerical studies are presented.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Christopher Russell, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Host
Owocki
360-degree videos are unique movies that are rendered all around you. No matter where you look - in front, behind, left, right, up, or down - you are watching the movie, though exactly what you see depends on where you look and when. Investments driven by 360-degree cameras have made these videos as easily shareable as regular movies: via the YouTube webpage on a computer, with the YouTube app on a smartphone, or get the most immersive experience in virtual reality (VR) goggles.
Location
Clayton Hall
Speaker
Dr. Joseph Taylor, 1993 Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Emeritus at Princeton University
Host
Provencal
Discovery of an orbiting pulsar in 1974 led to increasingly precise measurements that firmly established the existence of of gravitational radiation in the amount and with the properties first predicted by Albert Einstein. Join Dr. Taylor as he describes the torturous path from a theory published in 1915 to the detection of gravitational waves a hundred years later, with many fascinating developments along the way.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
James Jackman, University of Warwick
Host
Gizis
Stellar flares are explosive phenomena which, along with providing a way to probe the magnetic environments of stars, may seriously affect the habitability of planets around them. This is particularly true for M stars (e.g. Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1) which host Earth-sized planets in their close proximity “habitable zone”, yet regularly flare with energies greater than the largest Solar flares. In this talk I will present our study of stellar flares using the 13 second cadence full frame images of the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS).
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Zsolt Keszthelyi, Queen's University/Royal Military College of Canada
Host
Petit
Surface phenomena, such as mass loss, angular momentum loss, and magnetism have a large impact on the evolution of hot, massive stars. One-dimensional stellar evolution models rely on parametric prescriptions to account for such surface effects; however, the evaluation, revision, and a change in currently-used prescriptions has become inevitable. First, the impact of mass loss will be discussed and an experimental wind routine will be introduced.