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Location
SHL215
Speaker
Stanley Owocki, University of Delaware
Host
Owocki
Eta Carinae is one of the most massive and most luminous stars in our galaxy. In the 1840’s it had a "Great Eruption” that resulted in the bipolar Homunculus nebula we see today. But recent studies show there have also been prior “sprays” of mass ejected in distinct directions, with kinematic ages indicating several century intervals for eruptions dating back nearly a thousand years.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Christopher Russell, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Host
Owocki
360-degree videos are unique movies that are rendered all around you. No matter where you look - in front, behind, left, right, up, or down - you are watching the movie, though exactly what you see depends on where you look and when. Investments driven by 360-degree cameras have made these videos as easily shareable as regular movies: via the YouTube webpage on a computer, with the YouTube app on a smartphone, or get the most immersive experience in virtual reality (VR) goggles.
Location
Clayton Hall
Speaker
Dr. Joseph Taylor, 1993 Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Emeritus at Princeton University
Host
Provencal
Discovery of an orbiting pulsar in 1974 led to increasingly precise measurements that firmly established the existence of of gravitational radiation in the amount and with the properties first predicted by Albert Einstein. Join Dr. Taylor as he describes the torturous path from a theory published in 1915 to the detection of gravitational waves a hundred years later, with many fascinating developments along the way.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
James Jackman, University of Warwick
Host
Gizis
Stellar flares are explosive phenomena which, along with providing a way to probe the magnetic environments of stars, may seriously affect the habitability of planets around them. This is particularly true for M stars (e.g. Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1) which host Earth-sized planets in their close proximity “habitable zone”, yet regularly flare with energies greater than the largest Solar flares. In this talk I will present our study of stellar flares using the 13 second cadence full frame images of the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS).
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Zsolt Keszthelyi, Queen's University/Royal Military College of Canada
Host
Petit
Surface phenomena, such as mass loss, angular momentum loss, and magnetism have a large impact on the evolution of hot, massive stars. One-dimensional stellar evolution models rely on parametric prescriptions to account for such surface effects; however, the evaluation, revision, and a change in currently-used prescriptions has become inevitable. First, the impact of mass loss will be discussed and an experimental wind routine will be introduced.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Matthew Penny
Host
Dodson-Robinson
The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will be NASA's next flagship mission to follow James Webb. Roughly a quarter of WFIRST's primary mission will be spent conducting an exoplanet microlensing survey. The survey will provide a statistical assay of the cold exoplanet population with masses greater than that of Mars and orbits beyond ~1 AU, with a total planet yield comparable to Kepler's.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Gautham Narayan, Space Telescope Science Institute (STscI)
Host
Bianco
Despite observations of thousands of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we still do not have a clear understanding of the progenitor systems of these explosions. Our limited understanding of these events restricts our understanding of the nature of Dark Energy. The most promising path forward is obtaining observations of the SNe Ia within a few days of the explosion. I’ll discuss SN2018oh and other spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with exceptionally early-time observations, discovered by the Kepler Extragalactic Survey (KEGS).
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Wynn Ho, Haverford College
Host
Holder
Pulsars are famous for having very precisely measured spin rates, rivaling the precision of atomic clocks, and this spin evolves extremely regularly for most pulsars. However, the spin of young pulsars can occasionally undergo sudden changes, known as glitches. Glitches are thought to be due to interactions between normal and superfluid matter in the crust and core of the star. Thus observations and understanding of glitches allow us to probe fundamental nuclear physics and superfluidity. I will give an introduction to pulsar glitches and the superfluid model.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Amaya Moro-Martin, Space Telescope Science Institute
Host
Gizis
1I/'Oumuamua is the first interstellar interloper to have been detected. Because planetesimal formation and ejection of predominantly icy objects are common by-products of the star and planet formation processes, we address whether 1I/'Oumuamua could be representative of this background population of ejected objects. To do so, we compare the mass density of interstellar objects inferred from its detection to that expected from planetesimal disks under two scenarios: circumstellar disks around single stars and wide binaries, and circumbinary disks around tight binaries.