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Location
SHL215
Speaker
Matthew Penny
Host
Dodson-Robinson
The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will be NASA's next flagship mission to follow James Webb. Roughly a quarter of WFIRST's primary mission will be spent conducting an exoplanet microlensing survey. The survey will provide a statistical assay of the cold exoplanet population with masses greater than that of Mars and orbits beyond ~1 AU, with a total planet yield comparable to Kepler's.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Gautham Narayan, Space Telescope Science Institute (STscI)
Host
Bianco
Despite observations of thousands of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we still do not have a clear understanding of the progenitor systems of these explosions. Our limited understanding of these events restricts our understanding of the nature of Dark Energy. The most promising path forward is obtaining observations of the SNe Ia within a few days of the explosion. I’ll discuss SN2018oh and other spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with exceptionally early-time observations, discovered by the Kepler Extragalactic Survey (KEGS).
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Wynn Ho, Haverford College
Host
Holder
Pulsars are famous for having very precisely measured spin rates, rivaling the precision of atomic clocks, and this spin evolves extremely regularly for most pulsars. However, the spin of young pulsars can occasionally undergo sudden changes, known as glitches. Glitches are thought to be due to interactions between normal and superfluid matter in the crust and core of the star. Thus observations and understanding of glitches allow us to probe fundamental nuclear physics and superfluidity. I will give an introduction to pulsar glitches and the superfluid model.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Amaya Moro-Martin, Space Telescope Science Institute
Host
Gizis
1I/'Oumuamua is the first interstellar interloper to have been detected. Because planetesimal formation and ejection of predominantly icy objects are common by-products of the star and planet formation processes, we address whether 1I/'Oumuamua could be representative of this background population of ejected objects. To do so, we compare the mass density of interstellar objects inferred from its detection to that expected from planetesimal disks under two scenarios: circumstellar disks around single stars and wide binaries, and circumbinary disks around tight binaries.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Joel Dahlin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Host
Shay
Explosive solar activity in the form of coronal mass ejections and eruptive flares is generally agreed to be powered by the explosive ejection of highly stressed coronal magnetic fields. Magnetic reconnection has long been understood to be the primary driver for the explosive energy release. However, recent studies suggest that reconnection may also play an important role in both the formation and destabilization of the pre-eruptive field.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Federica Bianco, University of Delaware
Host
Gizis
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is the US flagship ground-based astronomical project of the 2020s, ranked top-priority in the 2010 report by the Committee for a Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Starting in 2023, LSST will conduct a 10-year survey of the southern sky generating a "movie of the southern sky" with repeated observations every few days. Uniquely, LSST promises to enable a diverse science return, from Solar System Near Earth Asteroid studies, to studies of the most distant explosions in the visible Universe, to cosmology.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Susan Mullally, Space Telescope Science Institute
Host
Provencal
NASA’s three transiting exoplanet hunting missions, Kepler, K2 and TESS, each have different scientific goals which are reflected by their different approaches to creating catalogs of exoplanets. The Kepler mission was primarily statistical in nature. It showed us that exoplanets are diverse and abundant in our Galaxy. It demonstrated that small exoplanets are common and that many planetary systems contain planets unlike any that exist in our solar system.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Sarah E. Logsdon, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Host
Gizis

In this two-part talk, I will discuss my instrumentation work in support of the NEID spectrometer and my ongoing research to detect and characterize late-type brown dwarfs. NEID is an optical (380-930 nm), fiber-fed, precision Doppler spectrometer currently in development for the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory as part of the NASA-NSF Exoplanet Observational Research (NN-EXPLORE) partnership.