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Location
SHL215
Speaker
Adam L. Friedman, PhD Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park
Host
Nikolic
The anticipated death of Moore’s law, which describes the exponential growth of processor capabilities, has resulted in a frantic search for new materials and new types of devices that can replace or (more likely) complement silicon MOSFETs as the primary components in device technologies. New spintronic (spin-based) devices fabricated from 2D van der Waals materials and their heterostructures promise lower-power, higher-performance devices and an avenue beyond Moore’s law.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Satoru Emori, Virginia Tech
Host
Jungfleisch
Minimizing magnetic damping is crucial for engineering spintronic devices (e.g., nanoscale magnetic memories and signal generators) that can be operated with low power input. However, the mechanisms of damping in various materials – even in the simplest ferromagnetic metals – have yet to be understood. In this talk, I will present our recent experiment that provides fundamental insight into magnetic damping in a simple model system: epitaxial thin films of pure Fe.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Igor Barsukov, University of California
Host
Jungfleisch

Injection of a pure spins current into a magnetic insulator modifies the chemical potential of magnons and can lead to intriguing phenomena such as long-range spin transport and magnon condensation. We study nanowires fabricated from a bilayer of a metallic ferromagnet and an insulating ferrimagnet. Via interlayer exchange coupling, magnons can be thermally transferred from one layer into another, constituting a pure spin current. The injection generates a non-equilibrium population of incoherent magnons.

Location
SHL215
Speaker
Vesna F Mitrovic
Host
Nikolic
Study of the combined effects of strong electronic correlations with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) represents a central issue in quantum materials research. Predicting emergent properties represents a huge theoretical problem since the presence of SOC implies that the spin is not a good quantum number. Existing theories propose the emergence of a multitude of exotic quantum phases, distinguishable by either local point symmetry breaking or local spin expectation values, even in materials with simple cubic crystal structure such as Ba2NaOsO6.
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
So Takei, CUNY
We propose two platforms for realizing macroscopic spintronics qubits. The first prototype magnetic quantum information processing device, based on spin superfluidity and spin Hall phenomena, realizes the spin-supercurrent analog of the superconducting phase qubit, and allows for full electrical control and readout. The second device stores a quantum state in a topological defect of a magnetic insulator and realizes the magnetic analog of the three-level rf-SQUID qubit.
Location
SHL 215
Speaker
Vasili Perebeinos, SUNY Buffalo
Host
Nikolic
In recent years, 2D materials, such transition metal dichalcogenides, have attracted much attention due to their excellent transport and optical properties. Using a Bethe-Salpeter equation, we investigate optical and excitonic properties of MoS2 monolayers in an applied in-plane electric field [1]. We predict a quadratic Stark shift and its scaling with the exciton binding energy, determined by the dielectric environment. I will also discuss our recent results on plasmon scaling in graphene nanoribbon arrays as a function of nanoribbon width, spacing between ribbons, and doping level [2].
Location
SHL 215
Speaker
Lyubov Titova, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Host
Nikolic

Two-dimensional, or 2D, materials are attracting considerable attention as a testbed for new physics and as candidates for applications in flexible nanoscale high-speed optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and chemical sensing. Most unique properties of 2D materials stem from their highly anisotropic optical and electronic properties. Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy provides access to those properties with ultra-high time resolution and without the complications of electrical contacts.

Location
SHL215
Speaker
Sergey Frolov
Host
Nikolic
Majorana fermions are non-trivial quantum excitations that have remarkable topological properties and can be used to protect quantum information against decoherence. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements on one-dimensional superconducting hybrid materials have revealed signatures of Majorana fermions which are the edge states of a bulk topological superconducting phase. We couple strong spin-orbit semiconductor InSb nanowires to conventional superconductors (NbTiN, Al) to obtain additional signatures of Majorana fermions and to explore the topological phase transition.
Date
Time
2:30PM
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Dmytro A. Bozhko, University of Kaiserslautern
Host
Jungfleisch

Finding new ways for fast and efficient processing and transfer of data is one the most challenging tasks nowadays. Elementary spin excitations - magnons (spin wave quanta) - open up a very promising direction of high-speed and low-power information processing [1]. Magnons are bosons, and thus they are able to form spontaneously a spatially extended, coherent ground state, a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), which can be established independently of the magnon excitation mechanism even at room temperature.