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Location
SHL 215
Speaker
R. C. Budhani, Morgan State University
Host
Jungfleiscih
The two-dimensional diffusive metal stabilized at the interface of SrTiO3 and the Mott insulator LaTiO3 has challenged many notions related to the formation and electronic behavior of the two-dimensional electron gas at the well studies LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Here we discuss specifically the stability of the superconducting phase at LaTiO3 - SrTiO3 interface and the nature of the superconductor - normal metal quantum phase transition driven by a magnetic field and by carrier density modulation through electrostatic gating.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
John Cumings, University of Maryland
Host
Jungfleisch
A scholarly adage of Materials Science tells us that, "Materials are like people; it's the defects that make them interesting!" However, when it comes to truly understanding basic physical properties, defects in crystals routinely present tough problems. Artificial Spin Ice (ASI) is a class of lithographically fabricated synthetic materials where the exact structure can be controlled precisely on nm length scales that determine their magnetic behavior. This provides a unique and fertile platform to study the behavior of magnetic order parameters and other degrees of freedom within solids.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Xin Fan, University of Denver
Host
Xiao

The anomalous Hall effect, discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880, describes a phenomenon that an electric current perpendicular to magnetization of a magnetic material can produce a charge accumulation in the direction orthogonal to both electric current and magnetization. Through century-long theoretical and experimental efforts, it is now understood that the anomalous Hall effect arises from the spin-orbit coupling.

Location
SHL215
Speaker
Hilary Hurst, University of Maryland College Park
Host
Nikolic
Control of magnetic textures via electric currents is an important step toward fabricating robust magnetic memory devices. We study the effect of conduction electrons on magnetic domain walls (DWs) in metallic, ferromagnetic nanowires. Using the Keldysh collective coordinate technique, we show how conduction electrons act as an external bath and derive the corresponding Langevin equations of motion for a DW including an electron-induced response kernel. The DW dynamics is described by two collective degrees of freedom: position and tilt-angle.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Zachary Ulissi, Carnegie Mellon University
Host
Nikolic
Increasing computational sophistication and resources can enable a larger and more integrated role of theory in the discovery and understanding of new materials. This process has been slower to infiltrate surface science and catalysis than the field of bulk inorganic materials due to additional scientific complexity of modeling the interface.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Kin Fai Mak, Cornell University
Host
Nikolic
Controlling magnetism by electrical means is a key challenge to more energy efficient information technology. The concept has been explored in a variety of materials including dilute magnetic semiconductors, ferromagnetic metal thin films and multiferroics. The recently emerged atomically thin magnetic materials provide unprecedented opportunities to study magnetism in the 2D limit and engineer devices through van der Waals heterostructures.
Location
TBD
Speaker
Antonio Azevedo, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Host
Jungfleisch
Spin waves (magnons) play a key role in many spintronics phenomena. For instance, they are responsible for the spin current flow in magnetic insulators and they can interact with other elementary excitations, such as phonons, photons, electrons, polarons, etc. In particular, magnons can strongly interact with phonons in materials with magnetostrictive interaction, creating hybrid magnon-phonon excitations (magnetoelastic waves).
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Adam L. Friedman, PhD Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park
Host
Nikolic
The anticipated death of Moore’s law, which describes the exponential growth of processor capabilities, has resulted in a frantic search for new materials and new types of devices that can replace or (more likely) complement silicon MOSFETs as the primary components in device technologies. New spintronic (spin-based) devices fabricated from 2D van der Waals materials and their heterostructures promise lower-power, higher-performance devices and an avenue beyond Moore’s law.
Location
SHL215
Speaker
Dr. Satoru Emori, Virginia Tech
Host
Jungfleisch
Minimizing magnetic damping is crucial for engineering spintronic devices (e.g., nanoscale magnetic memories and signal generators) that can be operated with low power input. However, the mechanisms of damping in various materials – even in the simplest ferromagnetic metals – have yet to be understood. In this talk, I will present our recent experiment that provides fundamental insight into magnetic damping in a simple model system: epitaxial thin films of pure Fe.