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Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Duy Quang To, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Delaware
Host
Nikolic
In this talk I am going to present my developments of the tunneling theory with multiband k.p method for a spinorbitronic application with semiconductor and related materials. Spinorbitronic combines the effects of spin and orbit, which via spin-orbit coupling, introduces new transport properties such as spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects. The latter is characterized by a deflection of the trajectory of polarized carriers in the transverse direction of their flow.
Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Marko Lončar, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University
Optically addressable electronic spin qubits associated with color centers in diamond have recently emerged as a promising quantum memory platform. While direct magnetic dipole interactions between these qubits are possible, they are hard to realize since they require deterministic placement of color centers within few nm of each other. An alternative approach takes advantage of photon-mediated interactions between spin qubits, using the cavity QED approach.
Location
ZOOM
Speaker
Yang-Hao Chan, University of California at Berkeley
Host
Nikolic
Atomically thin quasi two-dimensional (2D) insulating materials exhibit novel exciton physics due to ineffective screening, quantum confinement, and topological effects. Such exciton physics has recently been studied in details experimentally and theoretically. Going beyond near-equilibrium set-up, one expects that excitonic effects also dominate the responses of out-of-equilibrium systems and can lead to interesting phenomena in optically-driven 2D materials.
Location
Wolf 318
Speaker
Ryan Requist, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics
Host
Nikolic

The properties of molecules and solids derive from the quantum mechanics of the electrons and nuclei they are made of. As a full quantum many-body treatment is impractical, virtually all theories begin from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, where the many-electron problem is solved under the assumption that the usually sluggish nuclei are fixed in space. Solving the many-electron problem again and again for different fixed nuclear positions maps out an electronic wave function Phi_R, a conditional probability amplitude, depending parametrically on the set of nuclear coordinates R.

Location
Brown Lab 219
Speaker
Hao Shi, Flat Iron Institute
Host
Nikolic
The emergent and fascinating phenomena in strongly correlated quantum materials are in the interests of both fundamental science, material design, and technological applications. A major challenge is to be able to accurately compute the properties of electrons in these materials. Auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo is a promising numerical method for strongly correlated quantum systems. It is proven to be highly accurate and be able to treat large number of electrons in the Simons many-electron collaboration.
Location
**MEM111***
Speaker
Patrick Vora, George Mason University
Host
Xiao

Atomically thin materials derived from layered crystals have occupied much of the condensed matter community since the discovery of graphene in 2004. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are among the most versatile members in the family of layered materials due to the opportunities for tuning electronic behaviors with chemical composition, layer number, and structural phase.

Location
Sharp Lab 116
Speaker
Shiming Lei, Princeton
Host
Xioa

Quantum materials are believed to be key for many next-generation technologies, such as sensing, computing, modeling or communication, with higher accuracy or efficiency. Particularly, the magnetic quantum materials are promising for spintronic applications due to the interplay of magnetic order with electronic properties. To study the intrinsic material properties and evaluate the performance of novel devices fabricated from these materials, a high material quality is necessary. Otherwise the desired properties might be obscured.