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Date
Time
2:30pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Dr. Sergi Lendinez, Argonne National Laboratory
Host
Jungfleisch

Localized magnetic configurations such as magnetic vortices and magnetic droplet solitons are great subjects for applications and fundamental understanding of spin dynamics since they can be controlled with external fields, electrical currents, and microwave excitations. Magnetic vortices are the ground state of certain micropatterned structures, whereas magnetic droplet solitons are created in an extended magnetic thin film by local excitation of spin waves. However, damping works against the formation of stable magnetic droplet solitons, and their stability is more challenging.

Date
Time
2:30pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Dr. Vivek Shenoy, University of Pennsylvania
Host
Chui

Much of our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie cellular functions, such as migration, differentiation and force sensing has been garnered from studying cells cultured on two-dimensional (2D) substrates. In the recent years there has been intense interest and effort to understand cell mechanics in three-dimensional (3D) cultures, which more closely resemble the in vivo microenvironment. However, a major challenge unique to 3D settings is the dynamic feedback between cells and their surroundings.

Date
Time
2:00pm
Location
Room 215
Speaker
Professor Keivan Esfarjani, University of Virginia
Host
Chui

In this talk, we summarize the formalism we have developed to model heat transport in crystalline solids from first-principles density functional theory. We will illustrate the success of this approach by the results obtained for PbTe. In the second part, we will discuss the possibility of using 2D layered materials for converting heat to electricity in a solid-state thermionic device.

Date
Time
2:30pm
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Dr. Dimitris Niarchos, Emeritus Director of Research, Scientific Advisor Amen Technologies
Host
Hadjipanayis

One of the principal advantages of thermoelelectric devices is their ability to convert heat into electricity and vice versa without any moving parts. Thermoelectric power generation is based on the Seebeck effect, where a voltage is induced when a semiconductor is under temperature gradient. In last two decades, a great effort has been made to enhance the range of high-performance thermoelectric materials for industrial applications [1-3].

Date
Time
11:00AM (NOTE: morning seminar)
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Chao Zheng, University of Hong Kong
Host
Nowak

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) have drawn growing interest in magnetic field sensing applications owing to their high stability and sensitivity. At low frequency, the intrinsic magnetic 1/f noise sets the ultimate limit for detecting ultralow magnetic field. To gain insight into its mechanism, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) has been utilized, which describes the relation between magnetic 1/f noise and magnetic sensitivity product as a linear behavior.

Date
Time
1:00PM (NOTE: Special time)
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Branislav K. Nikolic, University of Delaware
Host
Chui

Boltzmann equation and Kubo formula will be introduced and illustrated with examples drawn from condensed matter and plasma physics. This is a make up lecture for PHYS813: Quantum statistical mechanics from Spring 2017 semester covering final topic of the course.