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Class of

Dr. DuBois received his Ph.D. in 2003 while working on Quantum Monte Carlo many-body simulations of mesoscopic Bose and fermionic systems under the supervision of Prof. Glyde. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California Berkeley, he became a research scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Date
Time
2:00PM
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
Joshua Nunn, University of Oxford
Host
Lorenz

Technologies that harness the quantum properties of light could enable secure communications, improved sensing and faster computing. But photon sources, photon-photon logic gates, and photon detectors are all probabilistic, so only small-scale experiments have so far been possible. Scaling up to larger devices requires synchronising each component, which can be done with quantum memories. I will show how even inefficient memories can dramatically increase the success rate of generating photons, and I will describe experimental progress in Oxford towards implementing a quantum memory for photons in cesium vapour.

Date
Time
2:00PM
Location
215 Sharp Lab
Speaker
David Ceperley, University of Illinois
Host
Glyde

Imaginary time path integrals provide both a way of understanding
quantum systems as well as a method to calculate their
properties. I will discuss their application to bose superfluids and
solids and a way to extend the method to quantum fermion systems.

Class of

Dr. Ryan Stearrett obtained his Ph.D. degree in 2013 in experimental condensed matter physics under the supervision of Prof. Edmund R. Nowak. The topic of his Ph.D. thesis was magnetization fluctuations and electronic noise in exchange-biased magnetic tunnel junctions during annealing. He is currently a process engineer at Intel in Oregon.

Class of

Dr. Sean Oughton obtained his Ph.D. degree in 1993 in space and plasma physics under the supervision of Prof. William H. Matthaeus. The topic of his Ph.D. thesis was Transport of Solar Wind Fluctuations: A Turbulence Approach. He is currently Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

May 22, 2013 - The University of Delaware College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) held its annual awards ceremony on May 15 in the Roselle Center for the Arts to recognize its alumni award winners and college award recipients. Marianna Safronova is associate professor of physics and astronomy whose research is in the field of high-precision theoretical and computational studies of atomic properties.

Class of

Dr. Peter Thejll received his Ph.D. in astrophysics in 1989 under the supervision of Prof. H. L. Shipman. His thesis research was focused on white dwarfs. He was a Carlsberg Fellow at the Niels Bohr Institute and worked at the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics. Dr. Thejll currently is a senior scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute in Copenhagen.

Class of

Prof. Bindiya Arora completed her Ph.D. degree in 2008 with Dr. Marianna Safronova. During her Ph.D. she worked on the modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum computation. After completion of her Ph.D. she worked at Guru Nanak Dev University (GNDU), Punjab, India as a guest researcher for two years, and then at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Mohali, India as a scientist. Thereafter she joined the Department of Physics, GNDU as Assistant Professor.

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