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TIME FOR A NUCLEAR CLOCK

UD physicist Marianna Safronova and collaborators have won a highly competitive “Synergy Grant” from the European Research Council to develop nuclear clock technology. The grant is worth more than $15 million over six years.

The atomic clocks that give extraordinary precision to the Global Positioning System (GPS) are based on transitions between energy states of atoms. Many advances have been made since the launch of the GPS satellites and the best world clock is now accurate to within one second every 30 billion years.

Multiple Faculty Positions in Quantum Science and Quantum Materials

The University of Delaware is expanding its Quantum Science and Engineering research program, which includes significant computational and experimental efforts in Quantum Materials.

The three positions to be filled this year include:

UD professor helps test the symmetry of space-time
Physicists like University of Delaware Professor Marianna Safronova are continually working to improve the precision of atomic clocks, which keep time by measuring the frequency of vibration within atoms, tiny particles made up of protons, neutrons and electrons. Atomic clocks are used to synchronize many global systems and allow considerable research in physics and other sciences, too.
UD’S ‘FIGHTING ASTROPHYSICIST’ NAMED A TED FELLOW
January 24, 2019 - Article by Beth Miller UD photo by Kathy F. Atkinson, boxing photo by Terrence Hamilton Federica Bianco is one of 20 worldwide for 2019 Given the powerful intellect inside her skull, it’s a bit unnerving to watch a film of University of Delaware astrophysicist Federica Bianco at work in the boxing ring. No, that’s not a typo.
COSMIC FIREWORKS
November 13, 2018 - UD astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays. Scientists have discovered something amazing. In a cluster of some of the most massive and luminous stars in our galaxy, about 5,000 light years from Earth, astronomers detected particles being accelerated by a rapidly rotating neutron star as it passed by the massive star it orbits only once every 50 years. The discovery is extremely rare, according to University of Delaware astrophysicist Jamie Holder and doctoral student Tyler Williamson, who were part of the international team that documented the occurrence.
‘FUDGE FACTORS’ IN PHYSICS?
October 10, 2018 - UD team says it’s time for a reboot Science is poised to take a “quantum leap” as more mysteries of how atoms behave and interact with each other are unlocked. The field of quantum physics, with its complex mathematical equations for predicting the interactions and energy levels of atoms and electrons, already has made possible many technologies we rely on every day — from computers and smartphones, to lasers and magnetic resonance imaging.